The Playbook For The Modern Man

Jeff Goldblum Pulled Off One Of The Hardest Trouser Colours For Men

It’s all blue, baby.

His name is Jeff and he’s done it again. Jeff Goldblum is no stranger to our celebrity style pages thanks to his eclectic mix of 1960s mod-rocker aesthetics paired to supreme tailoring.

When he’s not in a black leather jacket or suit though, he’s lounging out in a polo shirt and one of the hardest trouser colours to wear today. It’s blue, baby. Baby blue that is.

Goldblum was snapped this week at a Q&A event in Los Angeles in a simple yet highly effective summer outfit which was textbook Goldblum — a.k.a. polished.

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A monochrome polo shirt with contrasting solid black collar and pocket was buttoned all the way up and tucked into his baby blue trousers. The secret to pulling off such a colour is simpler than you think. As with most bright colours you should never pair the piece with other bright pieces. Bright trousers? Go for a monotone top. Bright top, go for monotone bottoms. In this case Goldblum used his monocrhome polo to be paired with the baby blue trousers.

If you need more help check out our complete guide on how to wear colourful trousers without getting laughed at.

The whole look is further enhanced with black socks and wing-tipped brogues with stud detailing for that extra bit of flair.

And speaking of flair…

On his wrist was the always dependable Tank de Cartier timepiece which exudes all kinds of vintage cool. The black leather strap also makes for a great complement to the monochrome shirt’s details. Depending on the size, the Cartier Tank Solo can be acquired for between AU$3,750 and AU$5,100. The watch features the luxury brand’s signature square steel case, beaded crown and Roman numeral adorned dial.

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Consider this your next Goldblum masterclass. Or a guide on how to dress as a 66-year-old tom cat.

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