The Playbook For The Modern Man

Terry Crews’ Unbelievable Physique Sets Bar Unfairly High For Older Men

“His chest muscles have chest muscles”

Instagram feeds are continuously flooded with images of young semi-naked guys posing for pictures in the gym mirrors, their bathroom mirrors, or having their partner take a ‘not-candid’ candid photo of them looking longingly into the distance of some picturesque background, all for the purpose of showing off their dedicated to lifting weights and drinking protein shakes.

But while such images may be subject to criticism, or may even serve as inspiration for other youngsters wanting to turn their life around and better their health and fitness, what can be said for the slightly older generation? After all, just because the biological clock tends to start wreaking havoc on the body as we get older, it’s not impossible to counteract the sands of time and maintain a healthy figure.

High-profile celebrities such as The Rock and Mark Wahlberg are living proof of that statement, but one man in particular blows them all out the water. We’re talking about Terry Crews.

The former NFL linebacker turned comedy actor naturally had to build an impressive physique for his American football playing days. But now, at the age of 52 and since hanging up the boots and turning his hand to acting, his body shows no signs of shrinking down.

Case in point: a recent video Crews posted to his Instagram account of him on an exercise bike, with the caption “Sunday Cardio”.

While it’s not as quite an in-dept workout video compared to those we’ve seen from The Rock and Mark Wahlberg, it clearly shows Crews still has an unbelievable physique for a man of his age, proving to be an inspiration for older gentlemen everywhere.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Terry Crews (@terrycrews)

The video has received several comments, including some from the likes of Bear Grylls, “Man myth legend!”, and fellow muscle mountain Kai Greene, who says,

“Damn Boy ! Where is the body fat ?? If my body fat was that low . I would be getting ready to make some kind of sports changing announcement .”

Other comments include:

“His chest muscles have chest muscles”

“Simply amazing shape”

and

“This mf out here just discovering new muscles doctors never knew about.”

Crews has had the advantage of a fitness-orientated career, but what about the Average Joe who’s a member of the 50 club? How can they stay fit? DMARGE spoke to Heath Jones, Director of the Active & Ageless Over 50s Club, to find out.

Heath begins by telling us, “As we age the way we view and experience training changes. It is now not so much about training harder, it’s about training smarter.”

“I find a lot of people move into their more mature years and solely concentrate on activities that predominantly focus on cardiovascular fitness. These activities tend to be things like walking, tennis, swimming and bike riding.”

“This is a fantastic form of exercise. However, we are only targeting one facet of fitness.”

“Strength and mobility as we age is absolutely paramount if a person wants to lead a good quality of life well into their later years. By having good levels of strength and mobility we are able to perform daily activities safely and effectively.”

“Some of the biggest challenges that are faced as we age is the undoing of poor habits that have become routine for previous decades. These bad habits can lead to things such as poor biomechanics and muscular imbalances. These issues can result in an increased risk of injury, poor dietary habits and an adherence to exercise.”

“Training, particularly as we age, should be focused more to the movement of the exercise as opposed to aesthetically on the size of the muscle. For example, in an exercise routine, instead of doing a bicep curl, we can include a bicep curl to press.”

“An example of an individual muscular split session could be Monday – chest, Tuesday – legs, Wednesday – back etc. Instead of this style of training a full body circuit should be completed 3-4 times per week.”

“It is now recommended that healthy older adults should train 3 or 4 times weekly”

We imagine Crews trains at least once everyday. But hey, baby steps.

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