Image: The Manual

Video Sums Up The Brutal Truth About Men Who Love Whiskey

"This one has notes of cedar oak, burnt BMW leather seats and swinging at the bouncer."

As is the unfortunate case with modern society, things you do, say and wear can often be the subject of mirth. Guys who skip leg day, for example, are ridiculed for the stark contrast between their huge upper bodies attached to a set of chicken legs. And, men who choose to wear an Avarca sandal may as well sign their own figurative (fashion) death warrant.

The same can be said of the drinks we choose to consume. According to close-minded stereotypes, men should drink beer and women should drink wine. Of course, as the world becomes less battered over the head with tropes, these roles can be reversed – there’s certainly nothing wrong with a man enjoying a glass of red with a steak or a chilled glass of rosé on a hot summer’s day. But what about bourbon and whisky (or depending on your geographical location, whiskey)?

The incredibly popular distilled drinks, made in locations around the world – with countries including Scotland, Japan, and the United States of America being notable producers – have certainly formulated a certain stereotype. Indeed, it would be common to associate dark spirits with images of men who only eat meat, have a broom for a moustache and who will only venture outside wearing a suit and a fedora.

This may only be true for gents who choose to order a whisk(e)y when out at a bar in a restaurant of course, as a far younger demographic may choose to drink it in the comfort of their own home. In fact, British polling agency YouGov found that 84 per cent of UK whisky drinks “started to enjoy whisky before the age of 31.”

Regardless, a TikTok video (watch it at the top of this page) produced by comedian Trevor Wallace perhaps captures the stereotypical whisk(e)y drinker perfectly. Donning the aforementioned moustache, glasses, and a set of braces to hold his trousers up, Trevor’s opening line sets the scene:

“I don’t drink whisk(e)y to be better than everybody. I drink whisk(e)y because I am better than everybody.” He then proceeds to do what we imagine a great deal of wannabe whisk(e)y lovers do: take a sip of it, because “of how smooth it is,” followed by a gag of disapproval.

His sketch also brings to light how some whisk(e)y drinkers will only drink some dram of a certain age: “What is this, only aged for two years?! Get this toddler out of here,” he exclaims.

He also plays on the idea that some drinkers will be able to tell you the aromatic notes they smell, in order to sound more educated than the people they’re with: “This one has notes of cedar oak, burnt BMW leather seats and swinging at the bouncer.”

Other unfortunate events to happen post-whisky drink are brought to the fore too, such as ‘Whisky Dick’, the slang term given to the phenomenon of alcohol-related erectile dysfunction: “You smell that? That’s the smell of my dick not working tonight. Or any night. It’s been 7 years.”

Not just reserved for whisk(e)y drinkers, but any type of alcohol, it’s unclear where the slang term originated, but clearly, whisk(e)y is the main culprit.

Trevor also covers whether one should drink their whisk(e)y neat (on its own), or on ice. As The Gentleman’s Journal states: “Ice in a single malt Scotch is one of the world’s most contentious issues. Some swear by its addition, claiming that a welcome drop in temperature affords the spirit a smoother, cleaner taste.”

RELATED: ‘Neat’ Whisky Drinking Rules You Need To Know, According To Experts

“But others decree ice in fine whiskies, and consider cubes to have no place in our delicate, well-distilled drams.” The general consensus suggests you shouldn’t add ice to your whisky, but you could add a drop of water instead. Trevor is in the latter camp:

“Do I like my whisk(e)y on ice?” he ponders, before answering his own question with “What is this, a god damn musical?”

“Pu****s on ice, starring, you.”

“I like my whisk(e)y neat. Needs. Everyone’s. Attention. To how f*****g manly I am.”

You may or may not agree with Trevor’s barrage on the stereotypical whisk(e)y drinker. Either way, it’s definitely worth a laugh.

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