Vladimir Putin Documentary Explains Why He’s Invading Ukraine

And how he rose to power...

Image Credit: BBC

To some, the conflict between Russia and Ukraine is new (and terrifying) information. However, Russia’s leader, President Vladimir Putin began the conflict, named the ‘Russo-Ukrainian War,’ back in 2014.

While this war has been ongoing since 2014, the reason it’s all over your newsfeed right now in 2022, is because of two main reasons. Firstly, diplomatic talks with Russia that took place this month failed, and secondly, Putin has now decided to launch a full-scale invasion of Ukraine – up until now, the conflict has mainly focused on the status of Crimea, which is recognised as a part of Ukraine; much to Putin’s dismay.

It’s a complex issue and the main man behind this conflict, Putin, is complex himself, so it’s understandable if you’re finding the whole thing hard to completely understand. However, there’s an enlightening documentary that can help you wrap your head around it.

Putin: A Russian Spy Story, available for purchase on Apple TV for AU$9.99, is a three-part documentary series that explores how Putin came to power and even examines why Putin decided to start the conflict with Ukraine in the first place.

Putin: A Russian Spy Story sheds light on how the Russo-Ukrainian War started. Image Credit: Getty Images

The docuseries was written and directed by BAFTA Award nominee Nick Green and features gripping interviews with people in Putin’s inner circle, people who oppose him and even some of Putin’s victims. Plus, there’s extraordinary archive footage throughout too.

The first two episodes of Putin: A Russian Spy Story detail how Putin initially worked for the infamous KGB – the security agency for the Soviet Union – and how he asserted his power to eventually become Russia’s leader.

The third episode is the one that details why Putin decided he wanted to conquer Crimea and started the war with Ukraine; so if you’re only interested in an explanation of how the current Russia-Ukraine situation started, skip to episode three; although, the first two episodes are well worth watching as they’re highly illuminating and compelling.

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